Greece is The Word

I know that technically, it is grease and not Greece, but nevermind that. Same, same for this article anyway.

I saw my problems and I’ll see the light
We got a lovin’ thing, we gotta feed it right
There ain’t no danger we can go too far
We start believin’ now that we can be who we are – grease is the word
They think our love is just a growin’ pain
Why don’t they understand? it’s just a cryin’ shame
Their lips are lyin’, only real is real
We stop the fight right now, we got to be what we feel – grease is the word

(grease is the word, is the word that you heard)
It’s got groove, it’s got meaning
Grease is the time, is the place, is the motion
Grease is the way we are feeling

We take the pressure, and we throw away conventionality, belongs to yesterday
There is a chance that we can make it so far
We start believin’ now that we can be who we are – grease is the word

This is a life of illusion, a life of control
Mixed with confusion – what’re we doin’ here?

We take the pressure, and we throw away conventionality, belongs to yesterday
There is a chance that we can make it so far
We start believin’ now that we can be who we are – grease is the word

Writer(s): Jim Jacobs, Barry Gibb, Warren Casey

Copyright: Crompton Songs, Edwin H. Morris & Co. Inc.

Do you remember a short while ago, I said the beast is formed? That I said Greece had come into play? Did you watch? Did you pay very close attention to what happened? Did you link the collapse and shut down of two stock markets to that?
I bet you did too, you cheeky monkeys.

If you didn’t, allow me the pleasure of showing you it in one giant bite size piece. All at once. As you will remember, I tend to put it all together, rather than give you ‘updates’ that you easily forget in these times of daily destruction and devastation.

‘I saw my problems and I’ll see the light
We got a lovin’ thing, we gotta feed it right
There ain’t no danger we can go too far
We start believin’ now that we can be who we are – Greece is the word’

Politicians, media strike out at German refusal of Greek loan proposal

‘Late last year, Greek voters elected a government that promised to go to war against the European establishment, and make it change course. Can you blame them? The status quo is clearly not working for Greece, or for a lot of other Europeans. It’s why, across the continent, we are seeing the rise of angry parties on the extreme right and left. The solutions they propose are often entirely off-base. But the problem they are responding to is real.

In Greece, that reality is extreme. The more the country’s government cuts spending and services, the more an economy in recession contracts further. Greece’s European partners have repeatedly demanded that Greece return to economic health by dramatically chopping public spending, and Athens has largely complied. It has not worked.

The more Athens cuts, the more its economy is shrunk by the cuts, and the more Greece’s unsustainable debt burden, now at 177 per cent of GDP, grows relative to a shrinking economy. This is not some fanciful theory. It’s just arithmetic. Absent other ways of stimulating the economy – say, a lower currency, or an export and tourist boom sparked by recovery in the rest of the euro zone – Europe’s cure for Greece always promised pain without gain.

As we went to press, Greece and the EU leadership appeared to be very close to an agreement to keep the country from defaulting on its debts, to prevent its banking system from collapsing, and to keep it from exiting the euro zone.

To get such an agreement, however, Greece’s leaders have had to capitulate. After months of negotiations, and even after convincing the Greek people to vote No in a snap referendum on Europe’s harsh demands for more austerity, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is now bending his knee and saying, Yes. In return, his government is asking for what appears to be only modest debt relief.’

(Full Report)

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Greece turns to Russia as Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras rejects ‘absurd’ creditors’ demands

‘Russia is ready to offer Greece an improved price for Russian gas, the Kommersant business newspaper reported, citing a source in the Russian government. In return, Russia would want access to Greek assets, the source told the business newspaper.

Meanwhile, Athens is said to be keen for Russia to lift its ban on Greek fruit and vegetable imports. Moscow imposed the ban on member states of the European Union after the block imposed tough sanctions on entire sectors of the Russian economy in 2014.

The timing of the talks has raised eyebrows in Brussels. Tsipras was originally scheduled to meet with Putin in early May but the visit was brought forward. It was ostensibly done to avoid upsetting allies by appearing at a Second World War parade in Moscow on 9 May.

It has also raised concerns Athens and Moscow could be entering into a more serious alliance, united by a chilling of relations with Europe. Chief among the fears expressed in Brussels is that Greece looks to secure financial assistance from Moscow as it slides towards insolvency later in April.

European officials fear Russia would extend major financial assistance in return for assurances that Athens would eventually veto sanctions on Russia.’

(Full Report)

‘They think our love is just a growin’ pain
Why don’t they understand? it’s just a cryin’ shame
Their lips are lyin’, only real is real
We stop the fight right now, we got to be what we feel – Greece is the word’.

Washington Muscles In On Russia’s Oil Deal With Greece

‘If Ukraine drove a wedge between Russia and Europe, then the U.S. came in with a gigantic sledge-hammer and drove that wedge deeper.  Washington was the first to sanction Gazprom and other Russian energy companies as punishment for Moscow’s involvement in eastern Ukraine’s separatist movement.

Once that wedge was in place, Washington moved at light speed to convince at least two former Soviet satellite states, Lithuania and Poland, to develop their liquefied natural gas terminals to receive U.S. shale gas someday in the future.  The terminals are not exclusive to U.S. LNG, however, and U.S. gas will play a small role regardless.

Still, in Russia, where everything the western world does is looked at through a spy lens, those two new LNG terminals on Russia’s border were “evidence” of a Washington-inspired energy war with Russia. Let Europe fund the dirty work of reconstructing Ukraine’s economy. What Washington really wants is European energy markets.

This became even more evident this week when Secretary of State John Kerry wooed cash strapped Greece with a “counter-offer” to its part in Turkish Stream. Although the market does not know what that offer is, chances are  it comes with the stipulation of nixing the Gazprom deal. Washington suddenly discovered Greece as a natural gas play just days before Gazprom is set to ink the deal in Athens. In Russia, this can only be viewed as politically motivated.’

(Full Report)

EU Makes Greece ‘An Offer They Can’t Refuse’: Agree To A Deal By Sunday Or Go Bankrupt

‘European stock markets plunged suddenly into the red this afternoon as the war of words between Greece and its euro zone partners blew up again today and Greek banks watched their cash reserves disappear.

Greek negotiators were accused of arriving at crunch talks without any new proposals as a European Central Bank funding shutdown left the country’s crippled banks with just enough cash to remain solvent for a day or two.

Ahead of a ‘last chance saloon’ summit for Greece to persuade its creditors to resume bailout talks, Greek officials insisted to Reuters news agency that they had submitted new credit proposals to euro zone partners.

But euro zone counterparts denied that they constituted a new plan.’

(Full Report)

‘We take the pressure, and we throw away conventionality, belongs to yesterday
There is a chance that we can make it so far
We start believin’ now that we can be who we are – Greece is the word’

Greece Votes NO – Let The Chaos Begin…

‘The result of the referendum in Greece is a great victory for freedom, but it is also threatens to unleash unprecedented economic chaos all across Europe.

Meanwhile, the rest of Europe is about to experience a tremendous amount of pain as financial markets respond to the results of this referendum.  The euro is already plummeting, and most analysts expect European bond yields to soar and European stocks to drop substantially when trading opens on Monday morning.

Personally, I love the fact that the Greek people decided not to buckle under the pressure being imposed on them by the EU and the IMF.  But amidst all of the celebration, the cold, hard reality of the matter is that your options are extremely limited when you are out of money.

Now that the Greek people have overwhelmingly rejected the demands of the creditors, it will be very interesting to see what the EU and the IMF do.  Prior to the referendum, European leaders were insisting that a “no” vote would put an end to negotiations and would force Greece to leave the euro.’

 (Full Report)

‘This is a life of illusion, a life of control
Mixed with confusion – what’re we doin’ here?’

Grexit postponed: How the euro was saved by sinking Greece. Again

‘The European Union went into a recession along with the rest of the world in 2008; unlike Canada and the United States, much of the continent has never come out. Two of the EU’s largest countries, Italy and Spain, have recovered so little that their economies are smaller than they were seven years ago. The same goes for Portugal.

The unemployment rate for the euro zone, the 19 countries using the common euro currency, is 11.1 per cent – higher, after all these years of supposed recovery, than the Canadian unemployment rate at the bottom of the recession. Italy’s unemployment rate was just 6.1 per cent in 2007; it has since more than doubled. Spain’s count, 22.5 per cent, is nearly triple the prerecession figure.

Different choices would have led to a different outcomes, and still could, but instead of figuring out how to get out of recession, Europe’s political class keeps turning to policies that have pushed large parts of the continent deeper into it.

Late last year, Greek voters elected a government that promised to go to war against the European establishment, and make it change course. Can you blame them? The status quo is clearly not working for Greece, or for a lot of other Europeans. It’s why, across the continent, we are seeing the rise of angry parties on the extreme right and left. The solutions they propose are often entirely off-base. But the problem they are responding to is real.

In Greece, that reality is extreme. The more the country’s government cuts spending and services, the more an economy in recession contracts further. Greece’s European partners have repeatedly demanded that Greece return to economic health by dramatically chopping public spending, and Athens has largely complied. It has not worked.

Absent other ways of stimulating the economy – say, a lower currency, or an export and tourist boom sparked by recovery in the rest of the euro zone – Europe’s cure for Greece always promised pain without gain.

Mr. Tsipras’s Syriza party came to power aiming to convince Europe that a change of economic course was needed not just for Greece, but for all Europeans. Europe’s governing elite shrugged. If euro zone finance ministers accept the Greek offer – not yet a certainty, but likely – the result will not be the revolution Mr. Tsipras once hoped for. For the third time in five years, Greece will be signing up for the maintenance of the status quo.

But in purely political terms, the European project has been saved, at least for now. It has been spared the humiliation of its common currency losing one of its members, which would have spread uncertainty about its future, and threatened crises in other countries. That is not nothing.

However, Europe, led by Germany, has achieved this by once again kicking the can down the road. For the third time in five years, Europe has punted a problem into the future, and the people of the problem country with it. Sometimes there is wisdom in this; some wounds really are healed with time, and some problems, if set aside, resolve themselves. Is Europe’s economic condition such a thing? No.

Across the continent, angry parties of the left and right are being empowered by Europe’s economic policy failures, particularly in Southern Europe. The EU consensus may look alive and well in Brussels. But out on the periphery, a lot of hard rain has already fallen, and anger is growing.

(Full Report)

So, as of todays writing, the situation is:

Greece news live: Germans propose five-year temporary Grexit after Europeans warn trust is diminishing

Yanis Varoufakis wrote today that he is convinced “that the German finance minister wants Greece to be pushed out of the single currency to put the fear of God into the French and have them accept his model of a disciplinarian euro zone.”

The finance ministry has put forward a negative assessment to the other euro countries:”These proposals are missing centrally important areas of reform to modernize the country and to advance on the long-term economic growth and sustainable development,”

The Ministry suggested among other things that Greece shall transfer assets amounting to €50bn to a trust fund, which it sells and thus removes debt. Option two is Athens negotiating a ‘time out’ from the euro. It leaves the monetary union for at least five years and restructures its debt. However, it remains an EU Member State and receives further “growth-enhancing, humanitarian and technical assistance”.

The German finance ministry is refusing to comment, for now. The Greeks have also denied the Schaeuble master plan.

Mid-afternoon round-up

Euro zone finance ministers have been holed up for nearly two hours now. As we await more murmurings from Brussels, here’s a round-up of what we’ve known so far:

Greece’s future in the euro zone is hanging on a knife-edge, after Europe’s creditors warned the country has destroyed the trust of its partners with just over 24 hours remaining to secure Athens euro fate.

In a weekend billed as Europe’s “last chance” to save the single currency, finance ministers rounded on the Greek government for holding a referendum on the country’s bail-out terms only a week ago.

“The trust has been destroyed in unbelievable ways”, said German finance minister Wolfgang Schaeuble ahead of a crunch meeting of the eurogroup yesterday.

“We certainly can’t rely on promises” he said.

Slovakia’s finance minister, who represents one of the harshest critics of European largess to Greece, accused Mr Tsipras of being guilty of “time travel’.

Eurogroup president Jeroen Dijsselbloem – who represents all 19 finance ministers – questioned whether Mr Tsipras could implement measures which he had attacked as “blackmail” and “humiliation” only seven days ago.

“There is a major issue of trust – can the Greek government be trusted to actually do what they are promising, to implement over the coming weeks, days and years?” said Mr Dijsselbloem.

“Even if it’s all good on paper the question is whether it will get off the ground and will it happen”.

Spain’s finance minister Luis de Guindos said: “Credibility is very low, so we will see. I hope Grexit will not take place”.

“We certainly can’t rely on promises. In recent months, up until the last hours, the trust has been destroyed in unbelievable ways.”

“I do not think we will easily reach a decision.”

(Full Report)

 

In case you hadn’t guessed, I am behind Greece, all the way. I supported Scotland’s decision to make the break from Great Britain too and furthermore, I also support Russia. I firmly believe America needs to be slapped down, before they destroy us all and if Russia have the power to do that, then they should go for it. You might think I am wrong, and you are welcome to do that, but I ask you to read all the previous articles first and then ask, what have your countries citizens actually achieved in stopping or even delaying any of your Governments shenanigans? That’s right. Nothing. We need a mightier power. A friend of mine once said you don’t take a knife to a gun fight. Well this is the biggest gunfight we have ever witnessed. Choose now: Live on your knees or die on your feet.

So what has that got to do with the collapse of the stock markets in China and the shutdown of the Wall Street stock exchange?

Chinese Stocks Collapsed Right Before NYSE Shutdown

‘In a matter of just weeks, the world’s second-largest economy has seen a whopping $3 trillion wiped off the value of its stocks.

CBS News correspondent Seth Doane reports the plunge in the stock market in China is very much a domestic issue — not linked to problems in Greece — but it could be destabilizing in Asia.’

(Full Report)

See that? ‘Not linked’ and why would it be?

Is China’s Financial Crisis Really Bigger Than Greece’s?

‘Over a period of four weeks, Chinese companies lost some $3.9 trillion in value—a number more than 15 times the size of the entire Greek economy. The Chinese government has employed a range of strategies to halt the slide. Beijing relaxed restrictions on how much investors could borrow to buy stocks, and China’s largest brokerage firms announced a $19.4 billion plan to purchase shares in major companies. The government has restricted new company IPOs—lest they prevent investors from putting their money into companies already selling shares on the stock market—and have meanwhile suspended trading on thousands of other struggling firms. Most recently, China’s securities regulator announced that any shareholder owning stocks worth more than 5 percent of an individual company could not sell those stakes for the next six months. On Thursday, these measures temporarily seemed to work: The Shanghai Composite Index recovered 5.8 percent of its value, while another index, for the smaller stock exchange in the southern city of Shenzhen, jumped by 3.8 percent. Prior to that, each market had fallen over 30 percent since June 12.’(Full Report)See? No link whatsoever. Greece doesn’t have a patch on China, when it comes to bad management and crappy decision making. So, what happened in New York then? How is that ‘not linked’?

What In The World Just Happened To The New York Stock Exchange?

‘Do you believe that the New York Stock Exchange shut down because of a “technical glitch” on Wednesday?’

‘But what we do know is that the stock market crash in China got even worse the night before this shutdown.  The Shanghai Composite Index and the Hang Seng Index both declined by almost six percent overnight.  Overall, the Shanghai Composite Index is now down by more than 30 percent in less than a month, and the Chinese version of the NASDAQ is down by more than 40 percent…’

You know, anybody else would have just said, we are concerned that the Hang Seng Index just crashed, so we are taking the necessary precautions to ensure we reduce any potential knock-on effects that may or may not jeopardize the very delicate regeneration of our own economy or in order to avoid a total collapse, like last time, which of course would never happen (except for that one time) but it is better that we protect our investors, just in case we are erring on the side of caution’, but no that just wouldn’t do would it?

NYSEWhat do you think is happening? Do you think we are moving closer to a One World Currency? Do you think Greece and China are being punished for their open involvement with Russia with the manipulation of their economies? How do you see this ending?

Drop us a line and tell us your thoughts:

contact@notapoliticalbeast.com

Or post your comment below.

Post Categories: Conspiracy, Crazy Ideas, Current Affairs, Politics, Truth
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